HOME PRIVACY POLICY CONTACT US/SONGS MAP/INDEX BALDERDASH/REVIEWS DR. DREIMER'S DIARY DR. DREIMER'S OBSERVATIONS
DR. DREIMER'S DRIVEL LIMERICK LANE WEEKLY QUOTATION BANNER FEEDBACK/NEWS MUSIC DESCRIPTION/DOWNLOAD WORDS/USAGE PET PEEVES

 

Back to Observations by Topic

 

MISCELLANEOUS

 

1137. It is the unpleasant -- but necessary -- task of the curmudgeon to tell people that what they most desire is either improbable or impossible.

1128. The stronger the love, the greater the vulnerability to its loss.

1115. Just as cunning is "the dark sanctuary of incapacity," so the ad hominem remark is the refuge of those without facts, rational analysis, or coherent arguments.

1104. The collector of quotations is an intellectual magpie - selecting the shiny bits to relieve --and perhaps conceal -- the drabness of an insufficiently learned nest.

1080. The world is divided into two classes: the small number of those who know how to use the apostrophe -- and the vast hordes who do not.

1011. Our favourite essay-writing service is the one which boasts that it has "no tolerance for plagiarism."

859. The shortening days of fall are depressing enough; the acceleration of gloom with a switch to standard time is a peculiar perversity of outmoded tradition.  

824. Writer's block arises from self-doubt -- the fear of inadequate result. But creative success -- like happiness -- is not a target to be captured by direct and determined assault. It arises, serendipitously, from a process unfettered by anxious and prejudicial supervision.

816. Breaking the rules of grammar is most profitably done by those who know what they are.

814. Some pretend that use of the Oxford comma is "optional" – but this is nonsense. Those who fail to employ it regularly and consistently are, in some deplorable fashion, tainted – whether by laziness, by failure of aesthetic sensibility, or by sheer wretchedness and perversity of temperament. Indeed (as we often suspect of people who mount toilet paper the wrong way in the holder) it seems entirely likely that this sin of omission is the invariable marker of some deeper, quite troubling degree of moral turpitude.

788. The universe is a vast creative experiment.

771. Human speech should be reserved for the dignified and reasonable purpose of communicating with other sentient beings.  It should not be demeaned and devalued in a charade of "conversation" with machines.

766. Ice cream -- the great melter of all resolve.

763. There is nothing like a little money to gladden the heart.

623. Insufficient similarity
        Is the curse of analogy.

620. The "Brainy Quote" website accepts quotations only from the famous. This fact exposes a hypocrisy in the name which seems typically American: "Brainy Quote" is mere façade; the real importance -- the true fascination -- is not with brains -- or wisdom -- but celebrity.

505. A wordsmith is a word worrier. He worries words and the positions of words. His aim is to worry meaning into a bell of sound that has the ring of truth.

424. Predictions should not prance; the tightrope of the future requires a humility of caution -- a carefulness of balance.

413. It is impossible to be fully alive in the cold and dark of a Canadian winter.

412. Sometimes it is not worthwhile to articulate a scornful condemnation of others for their bad ideas; their own foolish remarks accomplish the task with admirable efficiency and satisfying immediacy.

385. It was an argument with the tenuousness of a gossamer thread floating in the mist, with the evanescence of a discontinuous filament drifting aimlessly in a pervasive, enveloping, fog of the intellect.

366. If one devotes oneself, with some reasonable degree of care and consideration, to the project of finding things at which to take offense, a magnificent success is guaranteed.

309. With increasing age, the daily walk becomes a kind of religious ritual -- a bodily incantation against debility and death.

300. The tall, impressive column of particular expertise is narrow, and of limited application; wisdom is often found in a broader vessel of general understanding.

240. There are few easy answers; most "easy answers" invite more difficult questions.

216. Purity of intent does not guarantee purity of result.

213: The size of a bureaucracy is in inverse proportion to the efficiency and productivity of the organization of which it is a part.

212. Benevolence wary is like to lose both name and reputation; benevolence blind and pure in heart may yet nourish the seeds of evil.

210. One seldom knows one’s true opinion until one has expressed it.

203. Creation and destruction are two sides of the same coin.

162. Ad hominem attacks
        Betray an absence of facts.

158. In the workings of government healthcare, a debilitating sclerosis slows the passage of vital fluid, hobbles the joints in movement, and fixes the organism to a hardened reef of unyielding stasis.

100. They weave not; nor do they spin. The fabric of their lives is less than a gossamer in the wind.  (An observation on the television program Jersey Shore.)

93. That life springs from inanimate matter is indeed miraculous; however, the marvels have their cost: life is opportunist, striving, voracious and unthinkingly cruel. Nor can man, as life’s most intelligent and creative form, deny the additional burden of cruelty that is deliberate.

89. Being nice is not always a virtue. Rudeness may be the correct response to stupidity.

85. Persistence is a virtue -- as long as you don't carry it too far.

83. Money that is obtained without effort is spent without conscience.

70. Varied is that which lays claim to the title: "music;” but without melody, there is no delight.

32. As to flattery--it is doubtless pleasant enough, but entirely foreign to our experience; any compliments we have received have been the result of sound observation, superior analysis, and unbiased judgement.

3. “Crippled” becomes “disabled,” and “disabled” becomes “physically challenged”– as if new words could make up for no legs.

1. That hypocrisy is so widespread and persistent is a tribute to its utility.